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11 Common Methods in Aquatic Therapy for Healing

Due to the sheer low impact on patients’ bodies, aquatic therapy is a standard physical treatment method. Water immersion has been demonstrated to decrease blood pressure and enhance circulation, among other things. In addition, aquatic treatment is suitable for individuals in serious pain, seniors, and those with particular diseases due to its non-abrasive characteristics.

Aqua therapists can use a variety of principles and methods to reach physical or functional objectives. The Bad Ragaz Ring Method is a well-known European approach. Deep Water Running, also known as Aqua jogging, was invented in the United States, and Ai Chi has lately gained popularity in Japan.

Ai Chi

Jun Konno invented this water treatment approach in the early 1990s. The fundamental idea of this type of therapy is diaphragmatic breathing. The other idea behind this method is resistance training in water. The technique’s main purpose is to facilitate relaxation while simultaneously increasing physical strength. This is an excellent kind of treatment for both stress relief and building muscle. Because it is less intense than, perhaps, going to the gym, it is ideal for relatively weak people to begin increasing strength. Once students are comfortable with Ai Chi, they can go to more demanding activities, such as those found in a gym.

 

Ai Chi Ne

Ai Chi Ne (also known as Eye Chee Knee) is a two-person stretching program. The Japanese term for “two” is “Ne.” Ai Chi Neuses respiratory methods to boost relaxation and, as a result, stretchability. Stress, joint strain, muscle tension, and the stretch reflex reaction are all reduced when breathing methods are used.

 

Aqua running

This is a type of jogging done in the water. It is an excellent cardiovascular conditioning workout since it enables you to avoid significant impact while still getting some cardiovascular activity. It is most suited for those unable to withstand heavy hits. Aqua running often requires the wear of a flotation device around the neck to hold the patient’s head above water.

 

The Burdenko method

This is a type of water treatment that is used to improve flexibility, coordination, stability, power, and speed. It entails the employment of buoyant apparatus particularly intended to challenge one’s center of gravity with the body in vertical postures. In addition, the speed may be changed to test the user’s reaction to variations in the center of gravity.

 

The Bad Ragaz Ring

The Bad Ragaz Ring technique uses floating rings at the neck, pelvis, knees, and ankles to help the patient in a horizontal posture. This approach is a resistance workout strategy that employs 33 degrees Celsius water to improve and mobilize. The patient’s force should be lower than the therapist’s force. It should be utilized in the early stages of patient rehabilitation. The Bad Ragaz ring should be used in conjunction with other therapies that aim to boost activity and involvement, such as water-specific therapy. This method improves endurance, range of motion, and balance and relaxes the patients.

 

Lyu Ki Dou

Lyu Ki Dou evolved from research into different hands-on therapeutic techniques, including Ai Chi, Tai Chi, and Qi Gong. The name was inspired by the Japanese phrase “Floating Life Energy Pathways.” Lyu Ki Dou stresses the facilitator’s self-care, which benefits the clients/patients who get any form of therapy or exercise programming from someone who has physically “switched on” this important life-giving fuel source that is within each of us.

 

Watsu

Watsu is a type of aquatic treatment in which a person performs flowing motions beneath the water. It is intended to relax a person while also providing therapeutic benefits thoroughly. This type of water treatment is always done under the supervision of a skilled therapist.

 

Halliwick Concept

This method is from England. The concept of Halliwick is about stability and balance. It consists of ten phases that include mental adaptation, motor control, and spin control. The emphasis is more on getting back on our feet if we lose our composure and balance.

 

Water Jogging

Running underneath the water is exactly as it sounds like in this easy activity.  Patients utilize a flotation device in deep water to perform jogging movements with their legs and arms while their feet do not contact the floor. To help patients maintain their balance, special shoes, buoyancy belts, and weights are employed. Water jogging is a low-impact activity that is excellent for cardiovascular conditioning.

 

BackHab

This is a self-contained curriculum that the user may do on their own. It was originally designed for patients with back difficulties, but it is currently utilized in group programs for people with impairments. Rather than focusing on one portion of the body, all of the bodily components work together to mend and repair the afflicted area. BackHab is an underwater walking program that uses a range of strides to achieve a number of advantages. It’s great for re-training your gait.

 

Feldenkrais

This approach, developed by Dr. Moshe Feldenkrais, combines delicate motion and concentrated attention to improving movement and human functioning. This approach attempts to develop flexibility and coordination and assist the person in rediscovering their inherent aptitude for smooth, efficient movement. These enhancements frequently generalize to improve performance in various areas of life.

 

Aquatic Therapy near me in Las Vegas

One of the greatest types of medicine is the use of warm water to bathe body parts in warm water therapeutic ponds. For a good reason, warm water treatment has withstood the test of time. Warm water treatment has been shown to be useful in treating a variety of musculoskeletal disorders, including fibromyalgia, arthritis, and low back pain.

Aquatic therapy is a fantastic option for seniors who struggle to exercise on land. Health & Care Professional Network has performed aquatic Therapy in Las Vegas for over 15 years.

For further information, please contact us at (702) 871-9917.

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